Pumpkin Spice Waffles

vegan gluten-free pumpkin waffles 1

I have never been terribly good at making breakfast for breakfast. Some people can whip up eggs on a moment’s notice, frittatas on a whim, biscuits and gravy whenever they feel like it, pancakes three times a week.

I am not one of those people. Breakfast for me is a cup of coffee, then usually either a granola bar and fruit or a green smoothie, which I’ve probably made with my eyes half-shut. Going out for breakfast is always fun, and once in a while I’ll mix it up with some overnight oats or something, but I never have time for anything more elaborate. Plus, I’m really bad at pancakes. 

vegan gluten-free pumpkin waffles 2

However, it’s fall. I had a weekend morning that was free and a half can of pumpkin puree to use up, plus a brand-new stovetop wafflemaker that we got for our wedding. Pancakes are a mess for me (they always stick, no matter how much butter or oil I use), but waffles are better. And even though I’m not always a fan of the big breakfast, Ben is. 

Most important of all, I promised you two weeks of pumpkin recipes! Here’s a delicious, crispy, delicately maple-flavored waffle that also happens to be gluten-free, vegan, and free from refined sugar. Best of all, the pumpkin and extra baking soda act as the egg substitute, eliminating the hassle of making a flax egg. A little cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves add to the festive autumnal flavor. If you’re feeling, like, nuts — you can top these with a tiny bit of pumpkin caramel chai ice cream and some candied pecans for a fall dessert waffle a la mode. Yum.

Pumpkin Spice Waffles
 
Author: Kate Wutz
Serves: 4
A vegan gluten-free waffle that’s full of fall flavor, not refined sugar. Top with pecans and dried cranberries for breakfast, or ice cream and candied pecans for dessert.
Ingredients
  • 1 3/4 cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup gluten-free flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill All-Purpose
  • 1/4 cup almond flour
  • 2 Tbsp coconut flour
  • 2 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • dash of cloves
  • 2/3 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 Tbsp melted coconut oil (or other oil)
Instructions
  1. In a glass measuring cup, whisk together the almond milk and apple cider vinegar. Set aside for a few moments and let curdle while you prepare the other ingredients.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the flours, baking soda, salt, and spices. Add pumpkin puree, melted coconut oil, vanilla, and almond milk mixture and stir until the batter is just smooth.
  3. Cook waffles according to the manufacturer’s instructions on your wafflemaker (mine was on the stovetop; one cup filled it, and after preheating, I cooked each waffle for 1 min, then flipped and cooked for another 2 minutes.
  4. Serve warm. Enjoy!
 

 

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Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake

vegan gluten-free pumpkin cheesecake 2

Guess what? It’s finally — finally — pumpkin season for real. The leaves are changing, the nights are freezing (in Idaho, anyway) and the grocery stores are full of giant winter squashes. I ordered a Pumpkin Spice Latte the other day. ‘Tis the season.

I know you guys are excited, too — and that’s why I’m posting two weeks of sweet and savory pumpkin recipes! Because when it’s pumpkin season, I fully believe you should take advantage of that. Throw that stuff in everything. I am.

vegan gluten-free pumpkin cheesecake 1

This vegan cheesecake recipe is not just another pumpkin post, though. This is the vegan cheesecake that made me realize that regular cheesecake is not my favorite. Why would anyone ever eat an overly rich and super-sweet slice of modified cream cheese when they could be eating this incredible goodness? 

I finally worked out the kinks in my vegan cheesecake recipe and technique, and the result is a beautifully light (but still substantial) whipped filling made mostly of coconut milk, cashews, and pumpkin with the perfect amount of honey and spices. I actually made an audible oh my god this is so good noise when I ate my first bite of this. And with the pecan-date crust giving that delicious nuttiness with a touch of caramel flavor? Forget about it. 

Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake
 
Author: Kate Wutz
The vegan cheesecake to end all cheesecakes — the one that makes you realize all other cheesecakes, non-vegan as they are, are kind of crap. Enjoy this taste of pure fall.
Ingredients
  • 25 pitted dates, soaked in hot water for 10 mins, then drained
  • 2 cups of pecans
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 2 cups cashews, soaked overnight, drained
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie mix)
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup (or honey, if you’re not vegan)
  • 1 Tbsp vanilla
  • 3 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • pinch ground cloves
  • 1/2 cup of cream from the top of a can of coconut milk
  • pinch allspice
Instructions
  1. Make your crust: Process dates, pecans and vanilla in a food processor until it begins to come together. Press into a springform pan, and place in freezer.
  2. Make the filling: Process cashews, pumpkin, and sweetener in a food processor until about as smooth as you can get it, but before it turns into nut butter.
  3. Add vanilla and spices and pulse a few times to combine. Add in coconut cream and process until smooth, whipped, and the texture of, well, cheesecake. It will be a tiny bit grainy, but it’s not noticeable as you’re eating it.
  4. Pour filling over prepared crust. Freeze to solidify, then store covered in the fridge for up to a week. Yum.
 
Notes
* To get the cream from the top of a coconut milk can, first find a can of coconut milk that doesn’t make a noise when you shake it. Then, flip the can over and open from the bottom. Carefully drain off the thinner liquid, then scoop the white cream out. You should have about a half cup of cream. Use the extra in coffee 🙂

 

 

Honey-Cinnamon Applesauce

honey cinnamon applesauce

You know those DirecTV commercials with Rob Lowe? Where the real Rob Lowe has DirecTV, while creepy or sad Rob Lowe has cable?

Imagine regular applesauce as creepy or sad Rob Lowe. The applesauce you buy at the store can be sad, barely apple-ish, really bland and not useful for anything except replacing oil in baked goods.

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